Wednesday 11, November 2015

Dubai – MENA Herald: Though recent international research points to a rise in the number of teenagers suffering from stress, many of them are not aware of the impact stress can have on their long-term mental wellbeing, according to Dubai-based multi-disciplinary consultancy Ebdaah.

A recent American Psychological Association (APA) survey says teenagers are now reporting higher stress levels than adults and year-round, teens are experiencing extreme stress at least once-a-month with most not knowing where to turn for help.

“The APA survey reveals that more and more teens appear to be adopting unhealthy stress management habits, including over eating,” said Jim Boylan, Ebdaah consultant and the child & adolescent psychiatrist who manages the training of registrars and students in the UK’s Northern Health Region For Training & Psychiatry.

“The real problem is that these unhealthy stress management techniques often lead to long-term health issues, including depression, anxiety, exhaustion and more frequent illnesses due to a weakened immune system.”

Yet Boylan says fully informed and aware parents, teachers and health workers could identify those teens really at risk and take steps to alleviate the stress.

“There is a common misconception that poor behaviour or lifestyles among teens is simply young people’s angst or a growing up phase – and while this can be true in many cases, this attitude can put those already on the path to mental illness further at risk.”

“There are stress management skills, including balanced nutrition and healthy lifestyle habits, which can help teens make the transition to adulthood safely and ready for the years ahead.”

In January, Boylan and Dr Madeleine Portwood, Ebdaah advisor and the British Psychological Society’s spokesperson on child development and neurodevelopmental disorders, will conduct a ground-breaking seminar – Ensuring Teenagers Live Life To The Full – in Dubai.

Through four probing modules, the full-day seminar, in Dubai, attendees will learn how to identify who’s most at risk and why and better understand the knock-on social impact to teenage sufferers.

“We will be discussing how to spot the warning signs and where teenagers, parents and teachers can turn to for help,” said Dr. Madeleine. “We will also share knowledge on how adults can ease teenagers’ strain and all attendees will leave with training tools designed specifically to address this teen dilemma.”